My Pride

AishaBy Aisha Mukulu

I am Aisha by name, born in a family of four children and one of them is boy. We grew up with a single mother who has a roadside business of roasting “gonja” and maize and she has to wake up very early in the morning and purchase them from the market. Since it’s hard for her to earn enough from this business, it’s difficult for me and my sisters and brother to sustain ourselves and cater for our basic needs, for example, clothing, accommodation, food, as well as school fees.

I studied and completed my first and second years of education. I did my first year in High Study Course (H.S.C) but, unfortunately, sat home for a year due to circumstances. I, therefore, had to work with my mother and get involved in the business for us to earn a better living. Many people started doubting me and had things to say about me; that I am a girl and my mother should not continue to let me go to school. I told my mother not to mind what people had to say.

I live in a very unsafe place for young girls because it’s full of sex workers (“Bamalaya”) who influence girls to join them and this, in turn, affects their future.

I got involved with the Rhythm of Life project which has made a great impact on my life. They are contributing towards my school fees and have taught me how to stay healthy and become a good girl leader in the community at large. I am grateful to God that I have completed my last year of High Study Course and I’m looking forward to joining university.

My advice to all young girls is to know that life is a journey and there are challenges along the way. But determination, patience and hard work is key to achieving what you need. Not forgetting that education is also the key to success, followed by respect for parents and elders.

Sex Work

The Sexual Health and Rights Project (SHARP), an initiative from the Public Health Program of the Open Society Institute, argues that access to healthcare for vulnerable peoples should be a universal right.

This blog is intended to provide a snapshot of the lives of the women we engage with on a day to day basis. We hope that there are useful lessons to take from the work we are doing. Ultimately, we want to ask policymakers and donors around the world to increase their support for the health and rights groups working to improve the life chances of sex workers. With funding we can continue our work in education, service provision and advocacy. By increasing access to health and social care services and promoting good laws and policies, we want to bring an end to discrimination against sex workers and reduce the incidence of HIV and other sexually transmitted diseases. More importantly, we want to create a world that is just.

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A new Rhythm of life.

Welcome to our blog!

We are a small charity operating in Uganda. We are interested in helping the tiny fraction of the Ugandan population who have been discriminated against and denied access to the healthcare system – the sex workers in the red light districts.

Please take the time to look through our pages and posts to find out what we are about. Your feedback and comments will be greatly appreciate, as well as your support.

With thanks,

From ROL Family