Dear Mr. President of Uganda

Mr. President,

How I wish to talk to you about our education system in Uganda. I am grateful for all your efforts to ensure that we acquire the best out of it. But we the future generation have something to say.

There are lots of loopholes that cause me concern. Did the minister of education inform you about the rising issue of denial of access to education taking place in your dear home? This has mostly affected the girl child and no one seems concerned about it. It needs to be addressed before our dear Country goes into a crisis. Today this might not be a problem, but its consequences will affect the future.

Just imagine a home where everyone is educated; girls becoming professors. For this country needs mothers that are well-learned for the development and prosperity of future generations.

Members of parliament must not focus on putting on a show and being a spectacle for the public just for the sake of winning votes. Rather, take action now to stop this social evil. During election campaigns, I always hear: “[we will bring a] change in the system of operations.” How I wish a law would be passed to punish every leader who makes a manifesto full of promises, and fails to deliver. This should be a crime!

Let’s act before the unspeakable happens. DENIAL OF EDUCATION IS A STAIN ON OUR NATION.

Thank you.

Yours sincerely,

Barbara Nazziwa

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GIRL CHILD EDUCATION

By Sharon

Education is a human right and a fulfilling experience that helps girls reach their potential.

Most girls in the world do not have this opportunity. In my country Uganda, this is due to cultural belief, religious practices, ignorance and, the worst of all, poverty.

Girls without education opportunity face a lot of problems like:

  • Isolation;
  • Early pregnancies;
  • Early marriages; and
  • High illiteracy rates.

You can imagine your own daughter, sister being married off just because she has no education and no choice to make.

We, as girls under the Rhythm of Life project, wish to have a Nation with Educated mothers and, therefore, we call upon all the decision-makers to improve our education system and see to it that every girl gets the same opportunity worldwide.

Sex Work

The Sexual Health and Rights Project (SHARP), an initiative from the Public Health Program of the Open Society Institute, argues that access to healthcare for vulnerable peoples should be a universal right.

This blog is intended to provide a snapshot of the lives of the women we engage with on a day to day basis. We hope that there are useful lessons to take from the work we are doing. Ultimately, we want to ask policymakers and donors around the world to increase their support for the health and rights groups working to improve the life chances of sex workers. With funding we can continue our work in education, service provision and advocacy. By increasing access to health and social care services and promoting good laws and policies, we want to bring an end to discrimination against sex workers and reduce the incidence of HIV and other sexually transmitted diseases. More importantly, we want to create a world that is just.

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